Tony Bottorff Riding High on Long Term Parking

Reprinted from Hollywood Movie Times
ComicPalooza Tony Bottorff
by Robyn Washington

Tony Bottorff made a noticeable entrance the other day when he rode into the parking lot on his 2015 Harley Sportster and tossed the keys to the valet. A risky move to trust that much horsepower to a teenager in a red vest. Needless to say, they didn’t attempt to move it and the bike sat in full view of the entrance to Abacus, our Dallas dinner spot on McKinney Avenue.

Bottorff’s newest comedy, Long Term Parking, is quite a “tail wagger.” We sat down to discuss the movie and his career.

RW: The role you play in this film is a departure from your other roles in film. Did you need to do anything to prepare to play this part?

TB: I wish I could say I did, but I let this one develop organically. I had Boston worked up fairly solid but knew from past experience that Paul Bright (film director) knows what he wants, so the first day of shooting kind of set the tone for Boston. Had I known it was going to be 38 degrees with a 30 MPH wind during my make out scene with Lisa (Sosa), I would have practiced bumping uglies in a meat locker with an industrial fan blowing on me.

RW: That’s quite a visual. Did anything go wrong during filming?

TB: Oh yeah. The weather would be hot one day and butt ass freezing the next. I think we all got sick before it was done. The one I remember was shooting with Gary Mahmoud in his office. I had to drink shots of Jameson, and trust me, I’m a cheap date when it comes to drinking. I’m asking Paul if we have some apple juice or something and he says, “I’ve got a case of Jameson, enjoy.” So I’m getting toasted before lunch, they’re fogging the office with this fog machine so thick it looks like the steam room at the YMCA, and Gary Mahmoud is killing me with his improv. I can’t keep a straight face to save me. I’ll tell you something, this was one of those film shoots where there was as much comedy between takes as there was during the shot.

RW: Can I spill the beans and tell people your character is a dog?

TB: I’m not a dog.

RW: Okay, partly a dog.

TB: Boston Nightly is a gumshoe bounty hunter who’s a true ‘guy’s guy’. He doesn’t sweat the small stuff and takes things in stride, loves his Jameson, neat, and his women hot. Nothing gets him worked up, not even looking down the wrong end of a gun barrel. He’s got a fun sense of humor, even when the jokes on him, which given his dog tail, is most of the time in this film.

RW: So you do admit your character has a dog tail.

TB: And teeth.

RW: This movie is very irreverent. What was your first thought when you read the script?

TB: My first thought? Well, I get an email from Paul saying he’s doing a film and I’d be PERFECT for the role of Boston. So I can’t wait to read it, right? I start reading and I’m killed on page three. I’m like ‘what the hell?’ I kept reading and was laughing out loud with the dialogue. My second thought, “Hey, I get to have sex in this! Bring it on!”

RW: What was it like to work with the other actors?

TB: It was awesome! This is my third film with Paul, and he never fails to assemble a great group of actors. Lisa and I had great chemistry! She would crack me up with her delivery even on the third take. And David Young and Gary Lee Mahmoud are comic geniuses. I would bust a gut laughing every day. Seriously, I couldn’t hold it together every time David would say “Do the dingus.”

RW: Should I ask?

TB: You gotta see it. Joel Hudgins, Brandon Gallagher, Dan Murphy, and Mary Farrar are awesome. And Natasha Straley, wow! She’s got perfect comedic timing and I get love scenes with her too? I’m like, thank you Mike Kearby for writing this!

RW: Mike Kearby’s original novel of the same name has a devoted fan club.

TB: I read Mike Kearby’s book several times before the shoot started. The guy writes so expressively. I mean, he’s got more names for bullets than guys have for their Johnson. The book is never boring and his fans have got to be just as awesome! He’s a cool guy. He came to the set when we shot at the bar. He’s the kind of guy you’d like to have a drink with and swap stories.

RW: Sounds like you’ve got a lot of stories to swap.

TB: Oh yeah. But not to print. It was a fun shoot. When you have a great group of actors that enjoy what they do and a director that let’s you have fun exploring the characters, you don’t want it to end.

LISA RENE SOSA OPENS UP ABOUT LONG TERM PARKING COMEDY MOVIE

Reprinted from Movie Times

by Eugene Stryker, Movies Today

We sat down with Lisa Rene Sosa at her favorite lunchspot in San Marcos, Texas overlooking the swimmers and tubers on the river to talk about her upcoming comedy film Long Term Parking.ComicPalooza Lisa Sosa

MT: In your newest movie you took a big departure from the dramatic roles of the past to play an outrageously funny character, Chel Caminetti. Tell us about her.

LRS: Chel’s a real ball buster. A big personality, blunt, irreverent and I use Boston (the film’s hero) for my own gains. Although I have a thing for him I’m not afraid to shoot him a couple of times to figure out what his game is. I like to think that Chel is the heart of Long Term Parking.

MT: You do shoot him, more than a couple times. But somehow he keeps coming back for more. What was it like to work with Tony Bottorff, who plays Boston Nightly in the film?

LRS: I LOVED working with Tony! From the very first day when I met him I knew we were going to get along great. Tony was easy going, open and funny — great things for an actress who also needs to kiss her leading man after just meeting him. I also loved working with everyone else, Joel Lane Hudgins, David Young, the entire cast. It was wonderful to see how everyone’s character evolved from what I read in the script to the actual actor performances.

MT: We got a sneak peak of the film at Movies Today, and it’s terrific! The director, Paul Bright, was right on target with the casting.

LRS: I don’t often audition or portray characters like Chel, and it was a real privilege to be cast as someone who’s her own woman AND a sexpot too. The script was funny, and some of my lines are my favorite from the films I’ve been in so far. I couldn’t wait to see how it would all come together. The more irreverent the better!

MT: Mike Kearby’s novel that was adapted for film has got a devoted following, I think probably because it’s so irreverent.

LRS: I am so looking forward to meeting the fans of Mike’s book. It’s great when there’s such a cult following with people who know the characters just as well as the actors do.

MT: What was it like to shoot the movie?

LRS: So we filmed over two weeks in December. Being in Texas our falls are pretty mild. Well, the first week was so hot. I mean it felt like summer really. But I thought at least we’re not freezing. Well, I spoke way too soon. That second week of filming felt like we were up north. I’ll never forget my last day of filming when we were at the storage facility. I was wearing this beautiful mink coat that Mary (Farrar) let me borrow and when Paul yelled “action” I’d take it off real quick, throw it to Mary, and film the scene.

MT: You’re kidding? You filmed those scenes wearing a skimpy blouse during a Blue Norther?

LRS: Paul would yell “cut” and I’d put the coat back on, and we’d all jump into the car to warm up before we had to get out and film again. We all took our turns getting sick. Within those two weeks I got sick, Tony got sick, so did Paul and Patrick (Henderson – sound recordist). Not the easiest thing to work when you’re sick AND have to do it when the weather wasn’t great. But we all soldiered on and finished our movie.

MT: Watching the film I guessed you were all joking around a lot. You had to be for you to play the part so naturally.

LRS: I needed to be comfortable being a loud personality, and showing off my body more than I’m used to. I let “Chel” lead me throughout filming, but I definitely took advantage of wearing fitted clothes. The longer I was on set the more I felt comfortable with both aspects of my character.

MT: Are you familiar with the song “June is Bustin’ Out All Over?” Your costume fit, ahem, very well. It sounds like a great shoot.

LRS:
Being on set for this film was amazing. Paul and Tony were so inviting which makes any working situation a pleasure to be a part of. I hated leaving set at the end of each day, and couldn’t wait to get to work the next day. That’s when you know you love what you’re doing.

MT: And we love what you’re doing, too.

Long Term Parking premieres at Houston’s ComicPalooza on Saturday, May 23rd at 8:00pm.